Alzheimer's Health Clinics Beckley WV

Alzheimer's health clinics provides diagnosis and management for Alzheimer's disease, including pharmaceutical treatment, psychosocial intervention, care giving for patients and many more. See below for local Alzheimer's health clinics in Beckley as well as advice and content on senior care and Alzheimer's disease prevention.

Beckley Area Medical Clinic
(304) 683-3265
705 West Main Street
Sophia, WV
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Arh Medical Assoc/Swvc Glen Daniel Off
(304) 934-5125
102 Coal River Road
Glen Daniel, WV
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Family Care Clinic
(304) 466-2501
Po Box 179
Nimitz, WV
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Family Care Clinic
(304) 466-2501
Po Box 179
Nimitz, WV
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

University Health Assoc
(304) 548-7272
Po Box 887
Clendenin, WV
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Gulf Family Practice
(304) 683-4304
Polk And Main St
Sophia, WV
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Family Healthcare Assoc
(304) 294-4880
209 Howard Ave
Mullens, WV
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Summers County Arh Clinic
(304) 466-2908
Terrace Street Box 940
Hinton, WV
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Summersville Pediatric Inc
(304) 872-7063
400 Fairview Heights Road Suite 302
Summersville, WV
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Roane General Medical Center
(304) 927-6822
200 Hospital Drive
Spencer, WV
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Blood Test to Identify Alzheimer's Risk In Sight

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A simple blood test to detect whether a person might developolder_man Alzheimer’s disease is within sight and could eventually help scientists in their quest toward reversing Alzheimer’s disease ’s onset in those likely to develop the debilitating neurological condition. 

Building on a study that started 20 years ago with an elderly population in Northern Manhattan at risk or in various stages of developing Alzheimer’s disease , a Columbia University Medical Center research group has yielded ground-breaking findings that could change the way Alzheimer’s disease is treated or someday prevent it. These findings suggest that by looking at the blood doctors may be able to detect a person’s predisposition to developing the dementia-inducing disease that robs a person of their memory and ability carry out tasks essential to life.

Results presented online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences during the week of Sept. 8, 2008 suggest that individuals with elevated levels of a certain peptide in the blood plasma, Amyloid Beta 42 (Aß42), are at increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and that the decline of Aß42 in the bloodstream may reflect the compartmentalization or “traffic jam” of Aß42 in the brain, which occurs in the brain’s of people with Alzheimer’s disease .

“To date, Aß42 levels have measured most reliably in the cerebrospinal fluid, which is more difficult to collect than blood,” said Nicole Schupf, Ph.D., Dr.P.H., associate professor of clinical epidemiology at Columbia University Medical Center and lead author of the paper. “Blood draws can be done with relative ease and greater frequency than spinal taps, which is typically the way cerebrospinal fluid is collected.”

In this study, researchers found that plasma levels of Aß42 appear to increase before the onset of Alzheimer’s disease and decline shortly after the onset of dementia. Researchers surmise that Aß42 may become trapped in the brain, which could account for the decrease in levels post-dementia.

The principal investigator on the Northern Manhattan study, Richard Mayeux, M.D., M.S., professor of neurology, psychiatry, and epidemiology, and co-director of the Taub Institute of Research on Alzheimer’s disease and the Aging Brain at CUMC, likens the finding to something similar that is seen in heart attack patients, who typically have elevated lipid levels in their bloodstream prior to a heart attack, but post-heart attack lipid levels may decrease.

Using more specific antibodies developed by the Ravetch Laboratory at Rockefeller University, the researchers were able to hone in on the most detrimental form of amyloid compound, the protofibrillar form of Aß, according to ...

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Factors that Slow Alzheimers and Dementia

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Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia are not inevitable with aging. In recent years, researchers have identified many factors that may slow or prevent the development of Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia .

Researchers have shown that the following factors can help prevent Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia :
  • Control diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and obesity. There's increasing evidence that these major risk factors for heart disease and stroke may also predispose people to dementia.
  • Control cardiovascular risk factors. Vascular dementia, a common form of the illness, results from damage related to small and large blood vessel disease. By controlling cardiovascular risk factors, you may prevent the blockages and damage to the blood vessels to your brain that can lead to this condition.
  • Manage depression. Like dementia, depression can cause difficulty in remembering, thinking clearly and concentrating. Sometimes, depression occurs with dementia. Treating depression won't stop dementia from progressing, but it could help minimize its impact.
  • Keep your mind sharp. Some researchers believe that lifelong learning may promote the growth of additional synapses in your brain, and, therefore, reduce the risk of dementia. Try reading, writing stories or playing cards or checkers. Or start a new hobby. Studies have found an association between frequent participation in intellectually stimulating activities and reduced risk of Alzheimer's.
  • Stay connected with friends. Spending time with family and friends, volunteering or joining a group helps stimulate your memory, concentration and mental processing.

About Alzheimer's Disease 

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a slowly progressive disease of the brain that is characterized by impairment of memory and eventually by disturbances in reasoning, planning, language, and perception. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia , which afflicts 24 million people worldwide. Alzheimer's disease is not a normal part of aging and is not something that inevitably happens in later life. It is rarely seen before the age of 65. The likelihood of having Alzheimer's disease increases substantially after the age of 70 and may affect around 50% of persons over the age of 85.

About Dementia 

Dementia is a pro...

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Forgetfulness May be an Early Sign of Alzheimers Disease

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Alzheimers Disease Older adults who complain their "mind is going" may be losing a part of their brain gray matter along with their memory, according to a study published in the Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The study, which looked at 120 people over the age of 60, found people who complained of significant memory problems but still had normal performance on memory tests had reduced gray matter density in their brains even though they weren't diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which is a transition stage between normal aging and the more serious problems caused by Alzheimer's disease .

When compared to healthy individuals, the study found people who complained of significant memory problems had a three-percent reduction in gray matter density in an area known to be important for memory; there was a four-percent reduction among individuals diagnosed with MCI.

"Significant memory loss complaints may indicate a very early "pre-MCI" stage of dementia for some people. This is important since early detection will be critical as new disease modifying medications are developed in an effort to slow and ultimately prevent Alzheimer's disease ," said study author Andrew Saykin, PsyD, Professor of Psychiatry and Radiology at Dartmouth Medical School in Lebanon, New Hampshire, and an affiliate member of the American Academy of Neurology.

While normal aging, MCI and Alzheimer's disease have been associated with the loss of gray matter in the brain, this is believed to be the first study to quantitatively examine the severity of cognitive complaints in older adults and directly assess the relationship to gray matter loss.

Saykin says the findings highlight the importance of cognitive complaints in older adults, and suggest that those who complain of significant memory problems should be evaluated and closely monitored over time. Memory complaints, a cardinal feature of MCI which confers high risk for Alzheimer's disease, are reported in 25 to 50-percent of the older adult population.

The study was supported by the National Institute on Aging, the Alzheimer's Association, the Hitchcock Foundation, the Ira DeCamp Foundation, the National Science Foundation, New Hampshire Hospital and the National Alliance for Medical Image Computing.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 19,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating, and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit http://www.aan.com/ .

Reference: September 12...

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