Treatment for Alzheimer's West Point MS

Local resource for treatment for Alzheimer's in West Point. Includes detailed information on local Alzheimer's specialists that give access to pharmaceutical treatment, psychosocial intervention, behavioral intervention, cognition-oriented treatments, and coordination of care giving, as well as advice and content on Alzheimer's prevention.

Childrens Clinic
(662) 494-1620
720 Medical Center Drive
West Point, MS
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Starkville Rural Health Clinic
(662) 323-3361
P O Box 831
Starkville, MS
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Aberdeen Health Clinic
(662) 369-6131
501 Chestnut Street
Aberdeen, MS
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Macon Primary Clinic
(662) 726-4264
606 North Jefferson Street
Macon, MS
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Sledge Health Center
(662) 382-7828
Main And First Street
Sledge, MS
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Aberdeen Family Medical Center
(662) 369-8018
305 Highway 45 North
Aberdeen, MS
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Starkville Health Clinic
(662) 323-0094
308 Hospital Road
Starkville, MS
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Dr G Leroy Howell Ltd
(662) 323-2911
105 Felix Long Drive
Starkville, MS
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Woman's Clinic Of Columbia
(601) 736-6137
1212 Broad Street
Columbia, MS
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Glh-Minter City Clinic
(662) 658-1270
Highway 49 East
Minter City, MS
Specialty
Rural Health Clinic

Marijuana May Slow Progression of Alzheimer's Disease

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New evidence in rats suggests that marijuana may contain compounds that slow the memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease . Marijuana has strong anti-inflammatory effects, and many researchers believe that there is a compelling link between chronic inflammation and the progression of Alzheimer's.

"Inflammation in the brain is part of aging," Wenk said. "It happens to almost all of us as we age. But in some cases, this inflammation gets out of hand and causes serious damage."

Treatment with a synthetic compound similar to marijuana reduced inflammation in older rats in addition to making the animals "smarter," said Wenk, who is also a professor of neuroscience and molecular virology, immunology and medical genetics.

"The compound substantially improved the memories of the older rats," he said. "These animals were able to hold on to key details of a specific task. Untreated older rats, on the other hand, were not."

Evidence suggests that people who regularly smoked marijuana in the 1960s and 1970s rarely develop Alzheimer's disease, said Wenk, adding that researchers are eager to develop a drug with the anti-inflammatory properties of marijuana, but without the drug's psychoactive effects.

The colleagues treated young and old rats with WIN-55212-2 (WIN), a synthetic drug similar to marijuana. While the compound improved memory and helped to control inflammation, it is not a candidate for use in humans because it still contains substances that could trigger a high.

"We don't use marijuana in our experiments because we're trying to find a compound that isn't psychoactive," Wenk said. "And using synthetic compounds may eventually help us to separate the beneficial effects from the psychoactive effects."

The researchers inserted a small tube into the brain of each rat. The tubes were kept in place for three weeks to allow for periodic infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) a material that stimulates an immune reaction. LPS triggers a reaction that mimics the inflammation found in Alzheimer's patients.

Some of the rats were also treated with WIN daily for those three weeks.

The animals were subjected to a memory test during the third week of treatment. They navigated a water maze that requires finding an escape platform hidden just below the surface of opaque water. The rats were given several opportunities over three days to acclimate to the water maze. On the fourth day, the researchers timed how quickly each rat found the platform.

"The maze task is sensitive to memory impairment and also to aging," Wenk said. "Old rats tend to be pretty bad at navigating the maze. It's kind of like an elderly person trying to find his way around a house that he's not familiar with.

Once the testing was complete, the researchers b...

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Natural Treatment for Alzheimers Questioned

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A clinical trial led by Paul S. Aisen, M.D., professor of neurosciences at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, showed that high-dose vitamin B supplements did not slow the rate of cognitive decline in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease . Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia , which afflicts 24 million people worldwide.

Aisen is director of the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study (ADCS), a multi-center network spanning the United States and Canada, which conducted the clinical trial to determine if reduction of an amino acid called homocysteine would reduce the risk of Alzheimer disease or slow its progression. Homocysteine is known to be involved in neurological disease , including Alzheimer's, and its metabolism is affected by B vitamins. Therefore, it was thought that B vitamin supplements might offer a new therapeutic approach in treating Alzheimer' disease.

"Prior studies using B vitamin supplementation to reduce homocysteine levels in patients with Alzheimer's weren't large enough, or of long enough duration to effectively assess their impact on cognitive decline," said Aisen. "This study of several hundred individuals over the course of 18 months showed no impact on cognition, although it resulted in lower levels of homocysteine in these patients."

The study included supplementation with folic acid and vitamins B6 and B12 for 18 months in 409 individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. Participants were randomly assigned to two groups of unequal size; to increase enrollment, 60 percent were treated with high-dose supplements and the remaining 40 percent treated with identical dosages of placebo. A total of 340 participants (202 in active treatment group and 138 in placebo group) completed the trial while taking study medication. Cognitive abilities were measured via testing with the Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog).

The researchers found that the ADAS-cog score did not differ significantly between treatment groups, but that symptoms of depression were more common in the high-dose supplement group.

"Our study does not support the treatment of individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and normal vitamin levels with B vitamin supplements," the authors conclude.

The ADCS, a consortium of more than 50 research institutions in the United States and Canada, is headquartered at UC-San Diego and funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Additional contributors to the paper include Lon S. Schneider, M.D., M.S.; Mary Sano, Ph.D.; Ramon Diaz-Arrastia, M.D., Ph.D.; Christopher H. van Dyck, M.D.; Myron F. Weiner, M.D.; Teodoro Bottiglieri, Ph.D.; Shelia Jin, M.D., MPH; Karen T. Stokes, B.A., B.S. and Ronald C. Thomase, Ph.D.

About Alzheimer...

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Treatment Can Reverse Alzheimers Symptoms Within Minutes

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An extraordinary new scientific study, which for the first time documents marked improvement in Alzheimer's disease within minutes of administration of a therapeutic molecule, has just been published in the Journal of Neuroinflammation.

This new study highlights the importance of certain soluble proteins, called cytokines, in Alzheimer's disease. The study focuses on one of these cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF), a critical component of the brain's immune system. Normally, TNF finely regulates the transmission of neural impulses in the brain. The authors hypothesized that elevated levels of TNF in Alzheimer's disease interfere with this regulation. To reduce elevated TNF, the authors gave patients an injection of an anti-TNF therapeutic called etanercept. Excess TNF-alpha has been documented in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's.

The new study documents a dramatic and unprecedented therapeutic effect in an Alzheimer's patient: improvement within minutes following delivery of perispinal etanercept, which is etanercept given by injection in the spine. Etanercept (trade name Enbrel) binds and inactivates excess TNF. Etanercept is FDA approved to treat a number of immune-mediated disorders and is used off label in the study.

The use of anti-TNF therapeutics as a new treatment choice for many diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and potentially even Alzheimer's, was recently chosen as one of the top 10 health stories of 2007 by the Harvard Health Letter.

Similarly, the Neurotechnology Industry Organization has recently selected new treatment targets revealed by neuroimmunology (such as excess TNF) as one of the top 10 Neuroscience Trends of 2007. And the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives has chosen the pilot study using perispinal etanercept for Alzheimer's for inclusion and discussion in their 2007 Progress Report on Brain Research.

The lead author of the study, Edward Tobinick M.D., is an assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles and director of the Institute for Neurological Research, a private medical group in Los Angeles. Hyman Gross, M.D., clinical professor of neurology at the University of Southern California, was co-author.

The study is accompanied by an extensive commentary by Sue Griffin, Ph.D., director of research at the Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) in Little Rock and at the Geriatric Research and Clinical Center at the VA Hospital in Little Rock, who along with Robert Mrak, M.D., chairman of pathology at University of Toledo Medical School, are editors-in-chief of the Journal of Neuroinflammation.

Griffin and Mrak are pioneers in the field of neuroinflammation. Griffin published a landmark study in 1989 describing the association of cytokine overexpression in the brain ...

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